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Home » Asian Life » Asian News

Threats force all-girl band to quit

The first all-girl rock band in Indian-controlled Kashmir has quit after only one concert because of threats and a demand from a Muslim cleric that they stop performing.

The fate of Pragaash, which means "First Light" in Kashmiri, highlights the simmering tension between modernity and tradition in Muslim-majority Kashmir, where an armed uprising against Indian rule and a relentless crackdown by government forces have killed more than 68,000 people since 1989. Separatists criticised the band for what it said was "Western-style cultural waywardness."

Adnan Mattoo, the rock group's music teacher and manager, said the three high school pupils who formed Pragaash - drummer Farah Deeba, bass guitarist Aneeqa Khalid and singer and guitarist Noma Nazir - will not talk about their decision to disband and what led to it.

"They feel terribly scared and want an immediate end to this controversy once for all," he said. "First, the girls had decided to quit live performance due to an online hate campaign and concentrate on making an album. But after an edict by the government's own cleric, these girls are saying goodbye to music."

Pragaash performed in public for the first time in December in Srinagar, the main city in Indian-controlled Kashmir. It won third place in an annual "Battle of the Bands" rock show organised by an Indian paramilitary force as part of a campaign to win hearts and minds in the region.

Soon after the show, Kashmiri pages on social networking sites like Facebook hotly debated the band. Some questioned whether the performance was appropriate in the Muslim-dominated society in Kashmir and others raised broader questions on the Islamic approach to music and role of women in the society.

Many commentators backed the girls, but others were abusive, calling them "sluts" and "prostitutes" and calling for them and their families to be expelled from the region.

The controversy deepened after Omar Abdullah, the region's top elected official, promised a police probe into the threats and wrote on Twitter that "the talented teenagers should not let themselves be silenced by a handful of morons." The girls then became a political tool for all sides in the conflict.

Mufti Bashiruddin Ahmad, Kashmir's state-appointed cleric, issued a fatwa ordering the girls to "stop from these activities and not to get influenced by the support of political leadership."

Kashmir's main separatist alliance, the All Parties Hurriyat Conference, criticised Mr Abdullah for selectively supporting freedom of expression and said the band's concert was "a step toward diverting young girls toward Westernisation."

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